Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology

Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology

Section Editors iii

Contributing Authors iv

Preface xv

P

TRI

ART 1:PLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER1.

Epidemiology to Treatment.........................1

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: FromCLIFFOR

D A. HUDIS2.

and Basal Breast Cancers?..........................3

What is the Difference between Triple-NegativeMELANIE

D. SEAL AND STEPHEN K. CHIA3.

10,000 Feet..............................................8

Triple-Negative Breast Cancers: A View fromMAN

DIRA RAY AND BLASE N. POLITE4.

Triple-Negative and Basal-Like Breast

Cancer: Promising Clinical Target or

Only a Marker?......................................14

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor inMONIKA L. BURNESS, TATYANA A. GRUSHKO, AN

DOLUFUNMILAYO I. OLO

PADE5.

Antiangiogenic Agents ............................. 24

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role ofSALLY GREENBERG AN

D HOPE S. RUGO6.

Tumor Suppression: A Repair-Centric

Perspective.............................................30

BRCA Gene Structure and Function inCONLETH G. MUR

PHY ANDMARY ELLEN MOYNAHAN

7.

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer...................39

Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors inELIZABETH A. COMEN AN

D MARK ROBSON8.

Specific Chemotherapy Agents...................44

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role ofSTEVEN J. ISAKOFF

9.

Androgen Receptor ................................. 53

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role of theAYCA GUCAL

P AND TIFFANY A. TRAINAP

LOCAL THERA

OF LIVER METASTASES

ART 2:PIES IN THE TREATMENT10.

Treatment of Liver Cancer........................57

Introduction to Local Therapies in theWILLIAM

D. ENSMINGER AND ALFRED E. CHANG11.

Hepatic Imaging for Metastatic Disease.......59P

ETER S. LIU AND ISAAC R. FRANCIS12.

Metastasis: Evolving Role in the Setting of

Improving Systemic Therapies and Ablative

Treatments in the 21st Century..................69

Surgical Treatment of Hepatic ColorectalKAORI ITO, ANAN

AN

D GOVINDARAJAN, HIROMICHI ITO,D YUMAN FONG13.

Hepatic Malignancies...............................77

Thermal Ablative Therapies for SecondarySKYE C. MAYO AN

D TIMOTHY M. PAWLIK14.

Liver Cancer...........................................84

Focused Ultrasound as a Local Therapy forKRISZTINA FISCHER, WLA

DYSLAW GEDROYC, ANDFERENC A. JOLESZ

15.

Patients with Resectable Liver Metastases....91

The Role of Chemotherapy in ManagingTHORVAR

MICHAEL L. KEN

DUR R. HALFDANARSON,DRICK, AND AXEL GROTHEY16.

via the Operative and Percutaneous

Techniques for Patients with Isolated and

Unresectable Liver Metastases...................98

Development of Isolated Hepatic PerfusionH. RICHAR

D ALEXANDER, JR., ANDCAROLINE C. BUTLER

17.

Infusion Pumps.....................................108

Implanted Hepatic ArterialMARGARET K. CALLAHAN AN

DNANCY E. KEMENY

18.

Management of Liver Metastases ............. 116

Emerging Role of Radiotherapy in theANAN

D SWAMINATH AND LAURA A. DAWSON19.

Metastatic Liver Cancer..........................122

Chemoembolization for Primary andELENI LIA

PI AND JEAN-FRANCOIS H. GESCHWIND20.

for Primary and Metastatic Hepatic

Malignancies ........................................129

Radioembolization (Yttrium-90 Microspheres)AN

DREW S. KENNEDY AND RIAD SALEMP

CHEMOTHERA

CANCER

ART 3:PY FOR COLORECTAL21.

Colorectal Cancer..................................143

Introduction to Chemotherapy forE

DWARD CHU22.

Biology of Colorectal Cancer...................144MUHAMMA

D WASIF SAIF AND EDWARD CHU23.

Advances and Future Directions...............150

Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer: TreatmentBENOˆIT ROUSSEAU, BENOIST CHIBAU

JEAN-BA

CHRISTO

THIERRY AN

DEL,PTISTE BACHET, ANNETTE K. LARSEN,PHE TOURNIGAND, CHRISTOPHE LOUVET,DRE´ , AND AIMERY DE GRAMONT24.

Gene Profiling in Early Stage Disease ........ 158RACHEL MI

HAITHAM AL SALAMA, AN

DGLEY, KAKIL RASUL,D DAVID J. KERR25.

Chemotherapy for Colon Cancer..............162

Optimal Delivery of CytotoxicLAURA RAFTERY AN

D RICHARD M. GOLDBERG26.

Growth Factor Therapies with Cytotoxic

Chemotherapy in the Treatment of

Colorectal Cancer..................................168

Integration of Anti-Vascular EndothelialSUILANE COELHO RIBEIRO OLIVEIRA,

KARIME KALIL MACHA

P

DO, JORGE SABBAGA, ANDAULO M. HOFF27.

Receptor Therapies with Cytotoxic

Chemotherapy......................................174

Integration of Anti-Epidermal Growth FactorCE´ SAR SERRANO, BEN MARKMAN, AN

DJOSE

P TABERNERO28.

Colorectal Cancer..................................183

Treatment of Liver-Limited MetastaticJOLEEN M. HUBBAR

D AND STEVEN R. ALBERTS29.

with Colorectal Cancer...........................189

Chemotherapy for the Elderly PatientD

EREK G. POWER AND STUART M. LICHTMAN30.

Cancer.................................................201

Combined Modality Therapy for RectalBRUCE

D. MINSKY, CLAUS RO¨ EDEL, ANDVINCENZO VALENTINI

31.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer...................210

Molecular Markers in the Treatment ofP

ETER M. WILSON, MELISSA J. LABONTE, ANDHEINZ-JOSEF LENZ

32.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer...................221

Novel Agents in the Treatment ofSTE

AIK CHOON TAN, AN

PHEN LEONG, WELLS A. MESSERSMITH,D S. GAIL ECKHARDTP

IMMUNOTHERA

ART 4:PY OF CANCER33.

of Cancer.............................................231

Introduction for ImmunotherapyJEFFREY S. WEBER

34.

Chemoimmunotherapy...........................232LEISHA A. EMENS

35.

Cellular Vaccine Approaches ................... 241D

UNG T. LE, DREW M. PARDOLL, ANDELIZABETH M. JAFFEE

36.

the Next Advance? ................................ 248

Immune Regulatory Antibodies: Are TheyJE

DD D. WOLCHOK, ARVIN S. YANG, ANDJEFFREY S. WEBER

37.

Relevant?.............................................255

Dendritic Cells: Are They ClinicallyKAROLINA

JOSE

PALUCKA, HIDEKI UENO, LEE ROBERTS,PH FAY, AND JACQUES BANCHEREAU38.

Redirected to the Site of the Tumor?.........262

Chemokines: Can Effector Cells BeSTEVEN M.

AN

DUBINETT, JAY M. LEE, SHERVEN SHARMA,D JAMES J. MUL´E39.

to Redirect Effector Cell Specificity...........273

Adoptive Cell Therapy: Genetic ModificationRICHAR

D A. MORGAN, MARK E. DUDLEY, ANDSTEVEN A. ROSENBERG

40.

Suppression of T-Cell Immunity...............280

Regulatory T Cells: OvercomingTATIANA N. GOLOVINA AN

D ROBERT H. VONDERHEIDE41.

in Human Cancer..................................286

Myeloid-Derived Suppressor CellsSRINIVAS NAGARAJ AN

D DMITRY I. GABRILOVICH42.

Immune Suppressor?..............................292

Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase: Is It anHATEM SOLIMAN, MELANIE ME

DIAVILLA-VARELA, ANDSCOTT ANTONIA

43.

Inhibition and Immunotherapy in

Melanoma............................................298

Interface of Signal TransductionAMBER L. SHA

DA, KERRINGTON R. MOLHOEK, ANDCRAIG L. SLINGLUFF, JR.

44.

T-Cell Clones........................................305

Adoptive Therapy Using Antigen-SpecificCASSIAN YEE

45.

Use in Adoptive Immunotherapy..............312

Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells forCAMERON J. TURTLE AN

D STANLEY R. RIDDELL46.

Good Adjuvants?...................................320

Toll-Like Receptor Agonists: Are TheySACHA GNJATIC, NIKHIL B. SAWHNEY, AN

DNINA BHAR

DWAJ47.

Candidate Immune Modulators in Immune

Therapies for Cancer ............................. 330

Novel Gamma-Chain Cytokines asNATASHA M. FEWKES AN

D CRYSTAL L. MACKALL48.

Clinical Activity: A Potential Clue to Unlock

Cancer Immunotherapy..........................337

Gene Signature in Melanoma Associated withTHOMAS F. GAJEWSKI, JAMILA LOUAHE

D, ANDVINCENT G. BRICHAR

DP

THE ROLE OF THE ONCOLOGIST IN

ART 5:P

ALLIATIVE CARE49.

Palliative Care.......................................343

The Role of the Oncologist inNATHAN CHERNY

50.

Palliative Care.......................................344

The Oncologist’s Role in DeliveringNATHAN CHERNY

51.

Teams Improve Outcomes for Cancer

Patients and Their Families?....................355

What Is the Evidence That Palliative CareIRENE J. HIGGINSON AN

D CATHERINE J. EVANS52.

Oncology Settings..................................367

Standards for Palliative Care Delivery inS. YOUSUF ZAFAR,

CHRISTO

DAVID C. CURROW,PHER K. DAUGHERTY, ANDAMY

P. ABERNETHY53.

Tools in Routine Oncology Practice..........375

Utility and Use of Palliative Care ScreeningAMY

D

P. ABERNETHY, JANE L. WHEELER, ANDAVID C. CURROW54.

Realism ............................................... 392

Discussing Prognosis: Balancing Hope andTOBY C. CAM

BIREN SARAIYA, HOLLY B. YANG, ANTHONY L. BACK,

AN

PBELL, ELISE C. CAREY, VICKI A. JACKSON,D ROBERT M. ARNOLD55.

and When Is It Not?...............................397

Palliative Chemotherapy: When Is It Worth ItKEITH M. SWETZ AN

D THOMAS J. SMITH56.

and When Is It Not?...............................403

Palliative Radiotherapy: When Is It Worth ItSTE

LULUEL KHAN, E

PHEN LUTZ, TIMOTHY KORYTKO, JANET NGUYEN,DWARD CHOW, AND BENJAMIN CORN57.

They Worth It and When Are They Not?...412

Invasive Palliative Interventions: When AreFLORIAN STRASSER,

D

DAVID BLUM, ANDANIEL BUECHE58.

Working with a Palliative Care Team........417LAUREN A. WIEBE AN

D JAMIE H. VON ROENN59.

Depression, Anxiety, and Demoralization with

Advanced Cancer .................................. 422

The Oncologist’s Role in ManagingSIMON WEIN, AARON SULKES, AN

DSALOMON STEMMER

60.

Advanced Cancer .................................. 429

Evidence-Based Approaches to Pain inSY

DNEY MORSS DY61.

Symptoms in Advanced Cancer................436

Evidence-Based Approaches to OtherSY

DNEY MORSS AND COLLEEN C. APOSTOL62.

Emergencies in Palliative Care..................442D

IRK SCHRIJVERS, AND FRANK VAN FRAEYENHOVE63.

Treatment Options When Chemotherapy

Has Failed............................................449

Communication Skills for DiscussingBIREN SARAIYA, ROBERT ARNOL

D, ANDJAMES A. TULSKY

64.

with Advanced Cancer ........................... 452

Maintaining the Will to Live of PatientsLULUEL KHAN, REBECCA WONG, MA

CAMILLA ZIMMERMANN, CHRIS LO, LUCIA GAGLIESE,

AN

DELINE LI,D GARY RODIN65.

Dying Cancer Patient .............................460

The Oncologist’s Role in Care of theJU

DITH LACEY AND CHRISTINE SANDERSONP

IM

CANCER

ART 6:PACT OF HEALTH CARE REFORM ONPATIENTS66.

Impact on Childhood Cancer Patients and

Survivors ............................................. 471

Health Care Reform 2010: Expected FavorableJULIE WOLFSON, KATHLEEN RUCCIONE, AN

DGREGORY H. REAMAN

67.

Care Act of 2010 on Cancer in Young Adults

in the United States................................479

Potential Favorable Impact of the AffordableW. ARCHIE BLEYER

68.

Act: How Will It Affect Private Health

Insurance for Cancer Patients?.................488

The Patient Protection and Affordable CareKARYN SCHWARTZ AN

D GARY CLAXTON69.

Uninsured and Medicaid-Insured Cancer

Patients................................................492

Impact of Health Care Reform Legislation onKATHERINE S. VIRGO, ELIZABETH A. BURKHAR

VILMA COKKINI

DT,DES, AND ELIZABETH M. WARD70.

Medicare and Dual Medicare–Medicaid

Beneficiaries .........................................499

Impact of Health Care Reform onKENNETH E. THOR

PE AND MEREDITH PHILYAW71.

Act: Exploring the Potential Impact on

Oncology Practice ................................. 503

The Patient Protection and Affordable CareJOSE

PH S. BAILES, DEBORAH Y. KAMIN, ANDSHELAGH E. FOSTER

72.

The Intersection of Health Care Reform,

Primary Care Providers, and

Cancer Patients .....................................508

An Opportunity for Coordinated Cancer Care:LAUREN G. COLLINS, RICHAR

D WENDER, ANDMARC ALTSHULER

73.

Patient: A View from Cancer Executives....514

Impact of Healthcare Reform on the CancerLIN

TERI URSIN GUI

DA W. FERRIS, MATTHEW FARBER,DI, AND WILLIAM J. LAFFEY74.

of PPACA on Cancer Research.................520

The Anticipated and Unintended ConsequencesSTE

D

PHEN B. EDGE, LEONARD A. ZWELLING, ANDAVID C. HOHN75.

Diagnosis Among Patients Aged 55 to 74 Years

in the National Cancer Database..............527

The Association of Insurance and Stage atELIZABETH M. WAR

VILMA COKKINI

D, STACEY A. FEDEWA,DES, AND KATHERINE VIRGO76.

ObamaCare: Miscalculated Assurances ..... 534ROGER M. BATTISTELLA

77.

Legislation ........................................... 540

Concerns Presented by the New HealthSTUART M. BUTLER

Index 545

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Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Author / Editor: Vincent T. DeVita, Jr. / Theodore S. Lawrence / Steven A. Rosenberg
Section Editors iii

Contributing Authors iv

Preface xv

P

TRI

ART 1:PLE-NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER1.

Epidemiology to Treatment.........................1

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: FromCLIFFOR

D A. HUDIS2.

and Basal Breast Cancers?..........................3

What is the Difference between Triple-NegativeMELANIE

D. SEAL AND STEPHEN K. CHIA3.

10,000 Feet..............................................8

Triple-Negative Breast Cancers: A View fromMAN

DIRA RAY AND BLASE N. POLITE4.

Triple-Negative and Basal-Like Breast

Cancer: Promising Clinical Target or

Only a Marker?......................................14

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor inMONIKA L. BURNESS, TATYANA A. GRUSHKO, AN

DOLUFUNMILAYO I. OLO

PADE5.

Antiangiogenic Agents ............................. 24

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role ofSALLY GREENBERG AN

D HOPE S. RUGO6.

Tumor Suppression: A Repair-Centric

Perspective.............................................30

BRCA Gene Structure and Function inCONLETH G. MUR

PHY ANDMARY ELLEN MOYNAHAN

7.

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer...................39

Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors inELIZABETH A. COMEN AN

D MARK ROBSON8.

Specific Chemotherapy Agents...................44

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role ofSTEVEN J. ISAKOFF

9.

Androgen Receptor ................................. 53

Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Role of theAYCA GUCAL

P AND TIFFANY A. TRAINAP

LOCAL THERA

OF LIVER METASTASES

ART 2:PIES IN THE TREATMENT10.

Treatment of Liver Cancer........................57

Introduction to Local Therapies in theWILLIAM

D. ENSMINGER AND ALFRED E. CHANG11.

Hepatic Imaging for Metastatic Disease.......59P

ETER S. LIU AND ISAAC R. FRANCIS12.

Metastasis: Evolving Role in the Setting of

Improving Systemic Therapies and Ablative

Treatments in the 21st Century..................69

Surgical Treatment of Hepatic ColorectalKAORI ITO, ANAN

AN

D GOVINDARAJAN, HIROMICHI ITO,D YUMAN FONG13.

Hepatic Malignancies...............................77

Thermal Ablative Therapies for SecondarySKYE C. MAYO AN

D TIMOTHY M. PAWLIK14.

Liver Cancer...........................................84

Focused Ultrasound as a Local Therapy forKRISZTINA FISCHER, WLA

DYSLAW GEDROYC, ANDFERENC A. JOLESZ

15.

Patients with Resectable Liver Metastases....91

The Role of Chemotherapy in ManagingTHORVAR

MICHAEL L. KEN

DUR R. HALFDANARSON,DRICK, AND AXEL GROTHEY16.

via the Operative and Percutaneous

Techniques for Patients with Isolated and

Unresectable Liver Metastases...................98

Development of Isolated Hepatic PerfusionH. RICHAR

D ALEXANDER, JR., ANDCAROLINE C. BUTLER

17.

Infusion Pumps.....................................108

Implanted Hepatic ArterialMARGARET K. CALLAHAN AN

DNANCY E. KEMENY

18.

Management of Liver Metastases ............. 116

Emerging Role of Radiotherapy in theANAN

D SWAMINATH AND LAURA A. DAWSON19.

Metastatic Liver Cancer..........................122

Chemoembolization for Primary andELENI LIA

PI AND JEAN-FRANCOIS H. GESCHWIND20.

for Primary and Metastatic Hepatic

Malignancies ........................................129

Radioembolization (Yttrium-90 Microspheres)AN

DREW S. KENNEDY AND RIAD SALEMP

CHEMOTHERA

CANCER

ART 3:PY FOR COLORECTAL21.

Colorectal Cancer..................................143

Introduction to Chemotherapy forE

DWARD CHU22.

Biology of Colorectal Cancer...................144MUHAMMA

D WASIF SAIF AND EDWARD CHU23.

Advances and Future Directions...............150

Stage II and Stage III Colon Cancer: TreatmentBENOˆIT ROUSSEAU, BENOIST CHIBAU

JEAN-BA

CHRISTO

THIERRY AN

DEL,PTISTE BACHET, ANNETTE K. LARSEN,PHE TOURNIGAND, CHRISTOPHE LOUVET,DRE´ , AND AIMERY DE GRAMONT24.

Gene Profiling in Early Stage Disease ........ 158RACHEL MI

HAITHAM AL SALAMA, AN

DGLEY, KAKIL RASUL,D DAVID J. KERR25.

Chemotherapy for Colon Cancer..............162

Optimal Delivery of CytotoxicLAURA RAFTERY AN

D RICHARD M. GOLDBERG26.

Growth Factor Therapies with Cytotoxic

Chemotherapy in the Treatment of

Colorectal Cancer..................................168

Integration of Anti-Vascular EndothelialSUILANE COELHO RIBEIRO OLIVEIRA,

KARIME KALIL MACHA

P

DO, JORGE SABBAGA, ANDAULO M. HOFF27.

Receptor Therapies with Cytotoxic

Chemotherapy......................................174

Integration of Anti-Epidermal Growth FactorCE´ SAR SERRANO, BEN MARKMAN, AN

DJOSE

P TABERNERO28.

Colorectal Cancer..................................183

Treatment of Liver-Limited MetastaticJOLEEN M. HUBBAR

D AND STEVEN R. ALBERTS29.

with Colorectal Cancer...........................189

Chemotherapy for the Elderly PatientD

EREK G. POWER AND STUART M. LICHTMAN30.

Cancer.................................................201

Combined Modality Therapy for RectalBRUCE

D. MINSKY, CLAUS RO¨ EDEL, ANDVINCENZO VALENTINI

31.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer...................210

Molecular Markers in the Treatment ofP

ETER M. WILSON, MELISSA J. LABONTE, ANDHEINZ-JOSEF LENZ

32.

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer...................221

Novel Agents in the Treatment ofSTE

AIK CHOON TAN, AN

PHEN LEONG, WELLS A. MESSERSMITH,D S. GAIL ECKHARDTP

IMMUNOTHERA

ART 4:PY OF CANCER33.

of Cancer.............................................231

Introduction for ImmunotherapyJEFFREY S. WEBER

34.

Chemoimmunotherapy...........................232LEISHA A. EMENS

35.

Cellular Vaccine Approaches ................... 241D

UNG T. LE, DREW M. PARDOLL, ANDELIZABETH M. JAFFEE

36.

the Next Advance? ................................ 248

Immune Regulatory Antibodies: Are TheyJE

DD D. WOLCHOK, ARVIN S. YANG, ANDJEFFREY S. WEBER

37.

Relevant?.............................................255

Dendritic Cells: Are They ClinicallyKAROLINA

JOSE

PALUCKA, HIDEKI UENO, LEE ROBERTS,PH FAY, AND JACQUES BANCHEREAU38.

Redirected to the Site of the Tumor?.........262

Chemokines: Can Effector Cells BeSTEVEN M.

AN

DUBINETT, JAY M. LEE, SHERVEN SHARMA,D JAMES J. MUL´E39.

to Redirect Effector Cell Specificity...........273

Adoptive Cell Therapy: Genetic ModificationRICHAR

D A. MORGAN, MARK E. DUDLEY, ANDSTEVEN A. ROSENBERG

40.

Suppression of T-Cell Immunity...............280

Regulatory T Cells: OvercomingTATIANA N. GOLOVINA AN

D ROBERT H. VONDERHEIDE41.

in Human Cancer..................................286

Myeloid-Derived Suppressor CellsSRINIVAS NAGARAJ AN

D DMITRY I. GABRILOVICH42.

Immune Suppressor?..............................292

Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase: Is It anHATEM SOLIMAN, MELANIE ME

DIAVILLA-VARELA, ANDSCOTT ANTONIA

43.

Inhibition and Immunotherapy in

Melanoma............................................298

Interface of Signal TransductionAMBER L. SHA

DA, KERRINGTON R. MOLHOEK, ANDCRAIG L. SLINGLUFF, JR.

44.

T-Cell Clones........................................305

Adoptive Therapy Using Antigen-SpecificCASSIAN YEE

45.

Use in Adoptive Immunotherapy..............312

Artificial Antigen-Presenting Cells forCAMERON J. TURTLE AN

D STANLEY R. RIDDELL46.

Good Adjuvants?...................................320

Toll-Like Receptor Agonists: Are TheySACHA GNJATIC, NIKHIL B. SAWHNEY, AN

DNINA BHAR

DWAJ47.

Candidate Immune Modulators in Immune

Therapies for Cancer ............................. 330

Novel Gamma-Chain Cytokines asNATASHA M. FEWKES AN

D CRYSTAL L. MACKALL48.

Clinical Activity: A Potential Clue to Unlock

Cancer Immunotherapy..........................337

Gene Signature in Melanoma Associated withTHOMAS F. GAJEWSKI, JAMILA LOUAHE

D, ANDVINCENT G. BRICHAR

DP

THE ROLE OF THE ONCOLOGIST IN

ART 5:P

ALLIATIVE CARE49.

Palliative Care.......................................343

The Role of the Oncologist inNATHAN CHERNY

50.

Palliative Care.......................................344

The Oncologist’s Role in DeliveringNATHAN CHERNY

51.

Teams Improve Outcomes for Cancer

Patients and Their Families?....................355

What Is the Evidence That Palliative CareIRENE J. HIGGINSON AN

D CATHERINE J. EVANS52.

Oncology Settings..................................367

Standards for Palliative Care Delivery inS. YOUSUF ZAFAR,

CHRISTO

DAVID C. CURROW,PHER K. DAUGHERTY, ANDAMY

P. ABERNETHY53.

Tools in Routine Oncology Practice..........375

Utility and Use of Palliative Care ScreeningAMY

D

P. ABERNETHY, JANE L. WHEELER, ANDAVID C. CURROW54.

Realism ............................................... 392

Discussing Prognosis: Balancing Hope andTOBY C. CAM

BIREN SARAIYA, HOLLY B. YANG, ANTHONY L. BACK,

AN

PBELL, ELISE C. CAREY, VICKI A. JACKSON,D ROBERT M. ARNOLD55.

and When Is It Not?...............................397

Palliative Chemotherapy: When Is It Worth ItKEITH M. SWETZ AN

D THOMAS J. SMITH56.

and When Is It Not?...............................403

Palliative Radiotherapy: When Is It Worth ItSTE

LULUEL KHAN, E

PHEN LUTZ, TIMOTHY KORYTKO, JANET NGUYEN,DWARD CHOW, AND BENJAMIN CORN57.

They Worth It and When Are They Not?...412

Invasive Palliative Interventions: When AreFLORIAN STRASSER,

D

DAVID BLUM, ANDANIEL BUECHE58.

Working with a Palliative Care Team........417LAUREN A. WIEBE AN

D JAMIE H. VON ROENN59.

Depression, Anxiety, and Demoralization with

Advanced Cancer .................................. 422

The Oncologist’s Role in ManagingSIMON WEIN, AARON SULKES, AN

DSALOMON STEMMER

60.

Advanced Cancer .................................. 429

Evidence-Based Approaches to Pain inSY

DNEY MORSS DY61.

Symptoms in Advanced Cancer................436

Evidence-Based Approaches to OtherSY

DNEY MORSS AND COLLEEN C. APOSTOL62.

Emergencies in Palliative Care..................442D

IRK SCHRIJVERS, AND FRANK VAN FRAEYENHOVE63.

Treatment Options When Chemotherapy

Has Failed............................................449

Communication Skills for DiscussingBIREN SARAIYA, ROBERT ARNOL

D, ANDJAMES A. TULSKY

64.

with Advanced Cancer ........................... 452

Maintaining the Will to Live of PatientsLULUEL KHAN, REBECCA WONG, MA

CAMILLA ZIMMERMANN, CHRIS LO, LUCIA GAGLIESE,

AN

DELINE LI,D GARY RODIN65.

Dying Cancer Patient .............................460

The Oncologist’s Role in Care of theJU

DITH LACEY AND CHRISTINE SANDERSONP

IM

CANCER

ART 6:PACT OF HEALTH CARE REFORM ONPATIENTS66.

Impact on Childhood Cancer Patients and

Survivors ............................................. 471

Health Care Reform 2010: Expected FavorableJULIE WOLFSON, KATHLEEN RUCCIONE, AN

DGREGORY H. REAMAN

67.

Care Act of 2010 on Cancer in Young Adults

in the United States................................479

Potential Favorable Impact of the AffordableW. ARCHIE BLEYER

68.

Act: How Will It Affect Private Health

Insurance for Cancer Patients?.................488

The Patient Protection and Affordable CareKARYN SCHWARTZ AN

D GARY CLAXTON69.

Uninsured and Medicaid-Insured Cancer

Patients................................................492

Impact of Health Care Reform Legislation onKATHERINE S. VIRGO, ELIZABETH A. BURKHAR

VILMA COKKINI

DT,DES, AND ELIZABETH M. WARD70.

Medicare and Dual Medicare–Medicaid

Beneficiaries .........................................499

Impact of Health Care Reform onKENNETH E. THOR

PE AND MEREDITH PHILYAW71.

Act: Exploring the Potential Impact on

Oncology Practice ................................. 503

The Patient Protection and Affordable CareJOSE

PH S. BAILES, DEBORAH Y. KAMIN, ANDSHELAGH E. FOSTER

72.

The Intersection of Health Care Reform,

Primary Care Providers, and

Cancer Patients .....................................508

An Opportunity for Coordinated Cancer Care:LAUREN G. COLLINS, RICHAR

D WENDER, ANDMARC ALTSHULER

73.

Patient: A View from Cancer Executives....514

Impact of Healthcare Reform on the CancerLIN

TERI URSIN GUI

DA W. FERRIS, MATTHEW FARBER,DI, AND WILLIAM J. LAFFEY74.

of PPACA on Cancer Research.................520

The Anticipated and Unintended ConsequencesSTE

D

PHEN B. EDGE, LEONARD A. ZWELLING, ANDAVID C. HOHN75.

Diagnosis Among Patients Aged 55 to 74 Years

in the National Cancer Database..............527

The Association of Insurance and Stage atELIZABETH M. WAR

VILMA COKKINI

D, STACEY A. FEDEWA,DES, AND KATHERINE VIRGO76.

ObamaCare: Miscalculated Assurances ..... 534ROGER M. BATTISTELLA

77.

Legislation ........................................... 540

Concerns Presented by the New HealthSTUART M. BUTLER

Index 545

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General Information

Brexit Note: There will be an additional cost from UPS for orders shipped to the EU of £4.15 per carton. This will be payable by the customer in addition to any VAT and import duties.
 
When you buy this book from the Physio Shop you are in fact dealing directly with one of the world's largest medical publishers, Wolters Kluver Health (WKH). WKH is the parent of companies including Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins and the Anatomical Chart Company.
 
We also try to deliver to you anywhere in the world. Just register and login to the shop to see the shipping price to your destination. These costs are heavily subsidized by the publishers. Unfortunately we are restricted to non-USA sales.
 
We work directly with WKH and their distribution channel in the UK, NBN International, to deliver your items. This means there is no middle-man to slow up your delivery. If it is in print/stock and is in their warehouse then they'll get it out to you asap. Your orders are sent directly to the warehouse and are actioned usually within 48hrs during the working week. Sometimes charts and models are on regular re-stocking due to popularity however this is replenished on a weekly basis.
 
If any one item in your purchase is delayed NBN will typically send you what they have in stock and will send on the remainder as soon as it arrives. This is at no additional shipping costs to you. Sending and arriving are however two different things. We send as soon as we can. The mail man and delivery services mean orders can take anything from 48hrs to 3 weeks to arrive depending where in the world you are.
 
Even better, we currently maintain a flat fee structure for shipping of products from WKH. Buy as many books as you like the we will still charge you the one shipping fee. Perhaps club together with friends if you are after the same title to save even more on shipping!
 
All orders are actioned from the UK. The UK and Europe can therefore expect more speedy deliveries than those further afield. Rest assured we'll get it to you as fast as the mailing systems allow.
 
You are also provided with a direct email and phone link on your order invoice that will link you with the person/s responsible for your delivery should you have any queries after purchase.

Returns Policy Guidelines - Note the information below applies to BOOKS ONLY.

The range of anatomical models are not returnable unless damaged or faulty.

 
1. LWW Returns will be accepted by NBN International between 6 months and 18 months from date of invoice, providing that they are in mint and resalable condition and that invoice details are quoted on the return documentation.  
 
2. Authorisation from the Publisher is required for returns with a value of over £1000 before they are sent back to NBN International  
 
3. Returns documentation must be included in every parcel or carton sent back to NBN International showing title, ISBN, quantity returned and original invoice number and date or a copy of the original invoice included.  
 
4. Mint and resalable condition is defined as:  
 
1. no bent corners on covers
2. no folded or soiled pages (dirt, fingerprints, booksellers stamps, glue, stickers, writing or markings of any kind)
3. no torn covers or pages
4. no frayed, scuffed or worn covers
5. no broken, bent, folded or creased spines
 
5. Returns of products received from LWW in damaged or unsalable condition must be reported within 3 days of receipt and sent back to NBN International within 90 days from invoice date  
 
6. Returns of electronic media titles will not be accepted if the sealed packaging has been opened or damaged.  
 
7. Returns freight charges are the customer’s responsibility. Original shipping charged will not be refunded except in the case of faulty or damanged goods.
 
Out of Print Titles  
 
Returns will be accepted within 3 months of the date a title is declared by LWW to be superseded or out of print. Title pages will be accepted in the case of out of print/discontinued titles.  
 
All returns should be sent to our European distributors:-  
 
Returns Department
NBN International
Plymbridge House
Estover
PLYMOUTH
PL6 7PY
UK  
 
Returned products not meeting the above conditions will not be credited and will either be returned to the customer at the customer’s expense or destroyed.